Entries with tag visionontv .

How to make smartphone video report training stick?

I am doing a training of Quaker maybe wanabee journalists in Newcastle on the afternoon of Aug 2, 2014.

I am hoping that it may be the start of Quakers embedding some journalism into their social activist leanings. There is no budget at present but there are possibilities of future roll out on a wider scale, perhaps with some grant money from Quaker funders.

I am looking for any tips as to the essentials of  making a street reporters event stick so that it continues after the event with people doing reports and posting them up online. It's the usual $mln question really.

This event will last only a few hours, so my thinking is to mix a bit of the why do this with the practical how. A first step will be getting participants to bring as much workable equipment with them in advance so as to be able to hit the ground running.

They don't want for stories.

Walking visionOntv talk at HRW Film Festival 2012

 

I spent chunks of Saturday with Glenn McMahon as part of visionOntv’s coverage of the Human Rights Watch Festival 2012 in London.

It was a good chance to practise one end of the VOTV01.5 template (it hasn't got any cartoons to illustrate it yet, but if you want a peak at how to do it, click on this). I did the interviews, Glenn did the filming.

He used an iPhone 4 plugged into an iRig mic for the sound, compressing the resulting HD files down by putting it into iMovie editing software, exporting the result to the pic directory on the phone using medium resolution.

Glenn then transferred the compressed file to a laptop PC, passed it through avidemux compression software to take it down to around 50MB. From there, I used the oneload video distribution site to send it out to multiple vide hosting sites (YouTube, blip, vimeo and the rest).

I found it inspiring to talk to different film-makers and activists who are out there doing good work. Events such as this are a great chance to hook up with them, find out what they're doing and how, then trying to do it yourself.

The following are three of the videos that came out of it, the trickiest probably being the last, my first live interview with an interpreter.

They feature Mimi Chakarova, Mark Covell and Carlo Bachschmidt.

 

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